Center for Health, Identity, Behavior & Prevention Studies

Completed Research Studies

Syndemic Production Among Emergent Adult Men

Name: Project 18 (P18)
Funder: National Institute on Drug Abuse / National Institutes of Health
Dates: 3/1/2009-2/28/2014; 3/1/2014-2/28/2019
Principal Investigator: Perry Halkitis, PhD, MPH

Study Description

This longitudinal study follows the development of syndemics in a cohort of urban HIV-negative young men who have sex with men in New York City as they transition from adolescence into young adulthood, and apply, test, and further develop a theory of syndemic production to understand the development of both maladaptive and adaptive behavioral outcomes.

Testing a Model of Resilience to Develop an Intervention for Health Aging in Older HIV-Seropositive Adults

Name: GOLD III
Funder: NYU Provost Office Mega Grants Initiative
Dates: 5/1/2017-10/3/2018
Principal Investigators: Perry Halkitis, PhD, MPH, Farzana Kapadia, PhD, MPH & Danielle C. Ompad, PhD

Study Description

Description: Older (50+) people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) experience increased mental (e.g. depression, stress, anxiety, substance use, etc.) and psychosocial burdens (e.g. ageism, homophobia/homonegatvitiy, diminished social capital and social support, and social isolation, etc.) that exacerbates their physical health (e.g. HIV and HIV-related conditions, other chronic, etc.) and, in turn, diminishes their overall health. These multiple health states comprising overall health are interrelated and influenced by HIV therapies, the aging process, and psychosocial and structural conditions. To ensure the overall health and well-being of older PLWHA, we must attend to HIV and HIV-related conditions as well as mental health, psychosocial burdens and the physical conditions that affect aging adults.
One understudied area of focus is the understanding how resilience may serve to buffer the effects that HIV/HIV therapies, aging, and social/structural conditions have on health. Resilience is operationalized as a trait or characteristic that equips individuals with the ability to buffer against stressful life events and maintain their overall health/well-being. This project aims to evaluate a theoretical model that delineates the role of resilience in relation to the overall health/well-being (mental, physical and social) of older adults living with HIV and against the aforementioned stressors that impact overall health.

Project 18 (P18) Neighborhood Study

Funder: National Institute of Mental Health / National Institutes of Health
Dates: 4/01/2016-3/31/2018
Principal Investigator: Dustin Duncan, ScD
Co-Investigators: Perry Halkitis, PhD, MPH & Rumi Chunara, PhD

Study Description

This project seeks to investigate spatial mobility across neighborhoods as well as relationships between Global Positioning System (GPS)-defined activity space neighborhoods and HIV risk among young men who have sex with men (MSM) in the New York City metropolitan area, through the use of innovative methodological approaches including real-time geospatial methods and geo-located Twitter posts. We will randomly enroll 250 young MSM in the NIH-funded P18 Cohort Study in the proposed study to address the aims of the research. Eligibility requirements include report having had sex with another male in the past 6 months; HIV-seronegative; self-report no restrictions to usual physical activity; and willingness to complete a two-week GPS protocol. Participants will wear the GPS device following protocols we have used in our previous feasibility research projects. Findings from the proposed research will impact HIV prevention intervention activities. First, this research will inform specific neighborhood-level policy interventions. For example, increasing community efforts to combat lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) hate crime neighborhood rates through increased local police attention in high-crime locations may be an HIV prevention intervention. Second, given that we will know the travel patterns of young MSM, we can identify geographic locations for HIV testing/prevention interventions, which is an advancement of the literature as such interventions are not often spatially targeted. Finally, this research will also facilitate identifying geographic locations for recruiting young MSM in research studies (an improved method of venue-based sampling), in this understudied group.

Shabaab Study

Start Date: 10/15/2016
Principal Investigator: Paul Brown, MA
Co-Investigator: Perry Halkitis, PhD, MPH

Study Description

The purpose of this pilot study is to learn more about the experiences of Arab men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States; to survey and measure encounters with racism, ethnic and/or religious based discrimination and homophobia; and to find whether these experiences are associated with sexual risk behavior. Several research studies have shown associations between racial and ethnic discrimination, homophobia and sexual risk among other racial ethnic minority MSM in the U.S. However these associations have not yet been explored among Arab MSM. This pilot study seeks to shed light on a sorely understudied population.

Project P18 Viral

Funder: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/National institutes of Health
Dates: 9/1-15-8/31/16
Principal Investigators: Farzana Kapadia, PhD, MPH & Danielle C. Ompad, PhD

Study Description

Description: This ancillary study of HPV and HSV-1 and -2 infection as part of the P18 Cohort Study of racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse YMSM seek to (1) to detect cases of oral and anal HPV infection through site-specific PCR testing and clinically significant HPV subtype through serotyping and to estimate HPV persistence and clearance rates; (2) to identify uptake and completion of HPV vaccination via a combination of self-reported vaccination history in addition to New York State HPV vaccine registry verification; (3) to determine the prevalence and incidence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 by serology; (4) to estimate HIV risk among YMSM with and without HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 and to assess whether HSV infection explains racial/ethnic disparities in HIV risk; and (5) to determine the extent to which biological, behavioral, psychosocial and social/structural factors explain the likelihood of (a) oral/anal HPV infection, broadly and infection of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18, specifically; (b) HPV vaccination uptake, (c) HSV-1 and HSV-2 infection, and (d) co-infections of HIV, HSV, and/or HPV.

Understanding the Barriers and Facilitators to Health Care Access among Young Gay Men

Principal Investigators: Perry N Halkitis, PhD, MS, MPH & Farzana Kapadia, PhD, MPH
Funder: New York State AIDS Institute, New York State Department of Health
Dates: 4/1/2015-4/30/2016

Study Description

This mixed-methods study seeks to more fully explicate the dynamics associated with accessing care among YMSM. We will (1) identify the extent to which YMSM have access to health care facilities that serve the LGBT population; (2) disentangle the roles that sexual orientation and sexual behavior may play in preventing the access of consistent and appropriate care for YMSM; (3) delineate the patterns by which YMSM transition from healthcare from adolescence to young adulthood and pre and post coming out.

Understanding the Barriers and Facilitators to Health Care Access among Young Lesbians

Principal Investigators: Perry N Halkitis,PhD, MS, MPH & Farzana Kapadia,PhD, MPH
Dates: 5/15/2016-9/1/2016
Start Date: 9/1/2016

Study Description

This mixed-methods study seeks to more fully explicate the dynamics associated with accessing care among YWSW. We will (1) identify the extent to which YWSW have access to health care facilities that serve the LGBT population; (2) disentangle the roles that sexual orientation and sexual behavior may play in preventing the access of consistent and appropriate care for YWSW; (3) delineate the patterns by which YWSW transition from healthcare from adolescence to young adulthood and pre and post coming out.

Collective Trauma and Resilience among LGBTQ People in the Aftermath of the Orlando Mass Shooting

Dates: 07/27/2016 – 10/31/2016
Principal Investigator: Perry Halkitis, PhD, MPH
Student Investigator: Christopher Stults, MS, LMHC

Study Description

In the aftermath of traumatic events, including mass shootings, people in communities that were geographically close to the event often experience symptoms of trauma. However, the recent shooting in Orlando, FL, appears to have been motivated, at least in part, by hatred towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer-identified (LGBTQ) people. As such, experiences of trauma among people in the LGBTQ community may extend far beyond the geographic confines of the Greater Orlando area. To assess this hypothesis, a brief Internet survey assessing collective trauma (i.e., trauma experienced by an entire community) will be advertised on LGBTQ email listservs and Facebook pages. LGBTQ people will be invited to complete the survey, which includes items intended to assess experiences of collective trauma and resilience in the face of such atrocities.

Heroin Cessation and HIV Risk: A Case-Control Study

Name: CHANGE (Cessation of Heroin Addiction: A Neighborhood Grounded Approach) Study
Funder: National Institute on Drug Abuse / National Institutes of Health
Dates: 9/20/2007-7/31/2015
Principal Investigator: Danielle C. Ompad, PhD

Study Description

As a chronic relapsing condition, drug use is a major risk factor for HIV infection and lower access to HIV medications. Identifying factors associated with sustained cessation can contribute meaningfully to HIV prevention and treatment. The purpose of this case-control study is to characterize the individual and neighborhood-level determinants of initial and sustained cessation of heroin use among persons who report a history of chronic heroin use within economically disadvantaged, predominantly racial/ethnic minority neighborhoods in New York City. Data are sparse on the prognostic indicators and course of sustained heroin cessation, particularly in street-recruited samples. Likewise, while cessation makes sense in terms of parenteral HIV prevention, heroin dulls libido, and little is known about levels of sexual risk following heroin cessation short or long term. This study seeks to isolate potentially modifiable factors to assist the overall goal of sustained abstinence if not risk reduction. Key to this study is our recognition of cessation as not only an outcome, but also a possible exposure associated with sexual risk behavior.

Assessing HIV/STI Risk in Emerging Adult Gay and Bisexual Men in Consensual Non-monogamous Relationships

Dates: 12/09/14-12/31/15
Funder: Doug Kirby Adolescent Sexual Health Research Grant, Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention
Principal Investigator: Christopher Stults, MS, LMHC

Study Description

The purpose of this qualitative study was to elucidate how consensual non-monogamous (e.g. open, polyamorous, monogamish, etc.) relationships relate to HIV/STI risk. The study aimed to describe different types of CNM relationships among large sample of urban YMSM, assess how different CNM relationship structures relate to sex risk, elucidate how partners in CNM relationships perceive their own risk for HIV/STIs, communicate about extradyadic sex, and negotiate sex practices.

Assessing the HIV Care Cascade in Key Populations in Accra, Ghana

Funder: Global Public Health Research Challenge Fund
Dates: 9/1/2014–08/31/2015
Principal Investigator: Farzana Kapadia, PhD, MPH

Study Description

To characterize the extent to which the HIV care cascade is achieved for key, at-risk populations in Accra, Ghana.

Use of Real-Time Geospatial Methods in YMSM

Funder: Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, NYU School of Nursing
Dates: 1/1/2014-12/31/2014
Principal Investigator: Farzana Kapadia, PhD, MPH and Dustin Duncan, ScD

Study Description

This pilot study will provide an assessment of the feasibility of using real-time geospatial methods to explore spatial contexts of substance use and HIV risk in YMSM.

Neurocognitive and Psychiatric Outcomes among HIV+ Older Adults

Funder: NYU / Steinhardt Challenge Community Collaborative Awards
Dates: 5/1/2014-08/31/2014
Principal Investigator: Farzana Kapadia, PhD, MPH and Dustin Duncan, ScD

Study Description

To conduct a pilot study to determine the logistics and feasibility of examining the prevalence and correlates of a range of psychiatric and neurocognitive health states among older, HIV+ adults.

Social and Sexual Networks of Racially/Ethnically Diverse YMSM

Name: Project 18S (P-18S)
Funder: NYU / HHC Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Dates: 4/1/2012- 3/31/2013
Principal Investigator: Farzana Kapadia, PhD, MPH
Co-Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MPH

Study Description

The purpose of this pilot study is to understand the influence of social network-level factors on sexual- and drug use-related risk behaviors associated with sexually transmitted infection(STIs) (including N. Gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia T., and HIV) among Black, Latino and White young men who have sex with men (YMSM). The growing epidemic of these sexually transmitted infections among YMSM combined with the persistence of stark racial/ethnic disparities in STIs within this population underscores the need for novel research examining the interactions between broader cultural and social dynamics with the structure and characteristics of the social networks of YMSM. Given the paucity of empirical research on the relationship between these contextual influences and individual level sexual- and drug use -related risk behaviors as well as STI rates, the specific aims of this exploratory, pilot study are to (1) explore the relationship between social network structural characteristics and normative influences with sexual- and drug use-related risk behaviors among Black, Latino and White YMSM; and (2) examine the relationship between social network structural characteristics and N. Gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia T., and HIV outcomes among Black, Latino and White YMSM.

Harlem Community Academic Partnership: Influenza Immunizations

Name: Project VIVA Harlem
Funder: National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities
Dates: 5/22/2008 – 1/31/2013
Principal Investigator: David Vlahov, PhD, RN (UCSF School of Nursing)
CHIBPS Co-Investigator: Danielle C. Ompad, PhD

Study Description

Project VIVA (Venue-Intensive Vaccines for Adults) Harlem is a quasi-experimental project involving a multilevel community participatory intervention that is designed to improve influenza vaccination rates among adults aged 50 and older living in East and Central Harlem through a community-based participatory research approach. The Project VIVA Harlem team includes academic researchers from the UCSF School of Nursing, NYU’s Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies (CHIBPS), and the New York Academy of Medicine’s Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies along with community partners from Palladia, Inc. Working closely with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, we address both seasonal and pandemic H1N1 vaccination needs by developing health education approaches as well as providing or identifying opportunities for vaccination in non-traditional settings including pharmacies and community-based organizations.

HIV and Aging

Name: Project Gold
Funders: New York University, Institute of Human Development and Social Change (IHDSC) (12/1/2009-8/31/2010) and New York University Center for AIDS Research (9/1/10-8/31/2011)
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This mixed methods research project will utilize a cross-sectional survey and a qualitative interview to explore the ways in which individual psychological, developmental, and contextual processes impact HIV-positive men over 50’s lived experiences, risk behaviors, life perspectives and journeys. Study aims are to (1) determine the antecedents of and associations between illicit substance use, sexual risk taking, and cognitive ability among illicit drug users and non illicit drug users, (2) explore the resiliencies or adaptive behaviors utilized in this population, and (3) develop a qualitative understanding of the aging process and related quality-of-life issues among these HIV-positive men ages 50 and over.

YMSM Prevention Research Project

Name: Project Desire
Funder: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Dates: 12/1/2007-9/30/2009
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This project, in collaboration with the New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, was a mixed-methods investigation to better understand the recent increase in HIV incidence in young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in New York City. We also seek to develop and test HIV prevention messages tailored to this population. Project DESIRE will 1) document the patterns of sexual risk-taking behavior in a racially and ethnically diverse sample of YMSM in NYC, 2) develop a qualitative understanding of sexual risk-taking in this population, and 3) determine the effectiveness of HIV prevention messages as well as the needs of YMSM with regard to prevention messaging.

Methamphetamine Technical Assistance Grant

Name: LGBT Center Project
Funder: New York Department of Justice
Dates: 3/1/2007-6/30/2008
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

The goal of this project is to work with the LGBT Community Center of New York City to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the methamphetamine education and treatment program and to conduct an analysis of LGBT addiction services in New York State.

Getting Older with HIV in New York City

Name: Project 50+
Principal Investigator: Sigal Bar-Gill, MPH, MA, HHC
CHIBPS Co-Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MPH

Study Description

By 2015, 50% of all HIV-positive individuals in the USA will be 50 and over, with a substantial proportion of these being gay and bisexual men. We would like to determine if this population of Black, Latino and white gay and bisexual men (ages 50-59 years old), who are long term survivors of HIV, and are living in New York City, has any health problems that can be addressed by a change of lifestyle. The study will entail a quantitative analysis of computerized surveys, and a qualitative analysis of interviews. We would seek to explore how they see themselves in terms of their weight and body image. In addition, we would like to see how active or inactive they are, their nutritional status and its association with their overall health. Our ultimate goal would be to determine how to design and implement a wellbeing help plan for this population in order to improve their overall health.

Methamphetamine Use, HIV Behaviors and Mental Health in the Black Communities of New York City

Name: Project HOPE
Funder: New York Community Trust
Dates: 11/1/2006-12/31/2007
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

The goal of this project was to conduct a mixed-method, community-centered study to develop a holistic understanding of methamphetamine abuse and associated risk taking among gay, bisexual, and heterosexually-identified Black MSM in New York City.

Strategies for Identifying at-risk African American MSM who are Unaware of Their HIV Status

Name: Project ACCESS
Funder: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Dates: 8/1/2006-8/31/2009
Principal Investigators: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS, Rashi Rohagtghi, MPH.

Study Description

This project was a collaboration between Harlem United and CHIBPS-NYU. The goals of the project are to compare the efficacy of three strategies for identifying and testing previously-undiagnosed, 18-64 year old, African American MSM; to conduct a cost/resource analysis to evaluate the relative cost of identifying each previously undiagnosed, HIV-positive African American MSM for each of these strategies; and to determine the key variables associated with barriers to HIV testing in African American MSM, which will contextualize the cost efficacy of each recruitment strategy.

Straight Street – Risk Behaviors Among Young, Heterosexual, Emergent Adults

Dates: 8/1/2006-10/31/2006
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

The goal of this study was to develop a better understanding of the health behaviors of heterosexually-identified 18-25 year olds and the correlates between individual and person-level characteristics and these behaviors. More specifically, the focus of this study was to collect data on the sexual behaviors and drug use patterns of heterosexually-identified 18-25 year olds in New York City.

Evaluation of Women’s Case Management Services

Name: Project VOCALL (Voices of Clients at the Local Level)
Funder: New York State AIDS Institute & The United Way
Dates: 1/1/2005-12/31/2006
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This evaluation research project documented and assessed the effectiveness of case management services delivered by AIDS service organizations to women living with HIV/AIDS in New York City.

The Effects of Methamphetamine Abuse and Stress on the Frontal Lobes and Social Cognitive Functioning of Emergent Adults

Name: Project MASC (Methamphetamine and Social Cognition)
Funder: National Institute of Health/ National Institutes of Mental Health
Dates: 8/1/2004-7/31/2007
Principal Investigators: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS, Bruce Homer, PhD

Study Description

This pilot study, funded under the umbrella of the Mind Body Center at New York University’s Medical School, which considers the interaction of the mind and body, and seeks to foster an academic environment to conduct further research in this arena, sought to bring together three areas of study: addiction research, neural imagine, and social cognitive theory. Various data collection modalities were used including: social cognitive tasks, calendar-based methods to assess levels of drug use, clinical assessments of addiction, computer administered self-reports, and biological measures of stress; in addition to neural imaging to elucidate the relations of interest in a cohort of 45 gay/bisexual men. The specific aims of the investigation were: 1) To assess the relation between methamphetamine use and life stress, with regard to both social cognition and executive functions in emergent adults; 2) To assess differences in structure and the connectivity of neural pathways (e.g. prefrontal cortical structures, medical temporal lobe structures) associated with stress and methamphetamine use in emergent adults; and 3) To determine the relations between structural integrity/connectivity in key neural pathways with regard to both social cognition and executing functions in methamphetamine using emergent adults.

MSM’s Gym Sites Survey

Name: Project PUMP (Project Understanding Men’s Physicalities)
Funder: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/ New York City Department of Health
Dates: 3/1/2004-12/31/2005
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This study examined the sexual and substance use behaviors of men who have sex with men (MSM) that attend New York City gyms. The purpose of the study was to assess the variety of reported sexual behaviors and drug use patterns, in addition to overall health seeking and health risks in this population of men. As previous studies of these phenomena in the lives of MSM had focused recruiting in “gay social venues,” this study sought to explore these patterns in a separate subset of MSM in New York City.

OAR Supplement: Understanding Bareback Behavior

Name: Project B2B (BUMPS to Bare): Role of Intentions for HIV Prevention in Men
Funder: National Institute of Drug Abuse / National Institutes of Health
Dates: 9/1/2003-08/31/2005
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This study sought to understand the phenomenon of “barebacking,” the practice of intentional unprotected anal intercourse among gay and bisexual men, nested within life history methodologies. As such, we sought to (1) examine the meanings and definitions that men ascribe to intentional unsafe sex and differentiate these attitudes from “unintentional unsafe sex” (relapse); (2) assess attitudinal and social/contextual antecedents associated with the barebacking behaviors of gay/bisexual men; (3) measure drug and alcohol use and mental health co-factors in this group of men. In addition, we sought to understand the overall developmental trajectories of gay and bisexual men over time.

Project SPIRIT (Study of Religiousness and Spirituality among LGBT Individuals)

Dates: 6/1/2003-6/30/2009
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the relations between various psychosocial, religious, and spirituality variables in the lives of LGBT persons, specifically as they related to HIV risk-taking behaviors, substance use, and coming out experiences.

Perceived HIV Resistance among Men who Have Sex

Name: Project RADAR (Research and Discovery About Resistance)
Funder: National Institutes of Health / National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Dates: 7/1/2001-06/30/2002
Principal Investigators: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS, Fred Valentine, MD, Michael Marmor, PhD

Study Description

Project RADAR was a 1-year study, in collaboration with the New York University School of Medicine, which examined the extent to which some gay men believed they were resistant to HIV infection, and whether these perceptions of resistance to HIV infection were concordant with individuals’ histories of risks or immunologic characteristics.

Club Drug Use and Men’s Health

Name: Project BUMPS (Boys Using Multiple Party Substances)
Funder: National Institutes of Health / National Institute of Drug Abuse
Dates: 10/1/2000-08/31/2005
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This study examined the use of five party drugs popular among many gay and bisexual men: ketamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), crystal methamphetamine (Tina, crystal, ice), cocaine, and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Investigators sought to understand how social contexts of party drug use interact with men’s psychological factors to influence sexual risk-taking. As drug use patterns change over time, BUMPS followed 450 men for one-year to study how their drug use evolved. The project recruited participants from gay clubs, bars, public sex environments, community agencies, and Internet chat rooms.

Protease Inhibitor Adherence among Drug Users

Name: Project PILLS (Protease Inhibitor Longitudinal Life Study)
Funder: National Institute of Drug Abuse / National Institutes of Health
Dates: 9/20/1999-08/31/2004
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This study followed 400 men for one year and examined how participants’ drug use/ abuse, experience with medication side effects, and life events affected adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimes containing protease inhibitors (PIs), as well as explored the sex and drug risk behaviors of study participants. The underlying purpose of the investigation was to help community agencies design and implement effective medication adherence interventions. The study recruited participants from gay venues, drug treatment programs, and AIDS service organizations using active and passive recruitment strategies.

Methamphetamine Use among Gay/Bisexual Men in NYC

Name: Project TINA (Context of Methamphetamine Use)
Funder: American Psychological Foundation
Dates: 10/1/1999-09/30/2002
Principal Investigator: Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

This two-year study was CHIBPS’ first examination of crystal methamphetamine use in New York City among gay and bisexual men. It was also one of the first studies on the subject in New York at all. Investigators explored the context and culture of methamphetamine use among HIV negative and HIV positive gay and bisexual men in NYC. Project TINA also assessed the psychological, sociological, and behavioral correlates of use of this substance as well as the relationship of use to HIV-related sexual risk taking among those surveyed.

Behavioral Intervention Research

Name: Project SUMIT (Seropositive Urban Men’s Intervention Trial)
Funder: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Dates: 9/30/1998-9/29/2002
Principal Investigator and Co-PI: Jeffrey Parsons, PhD, Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

The major goal of this project was to conduct a randomized clinical trial of a six session group behavioral intervention aimed at reducing unsafe sex with HIV negative and serostatus unknown partners among HIV+ gay/bisexual men. The intervention was derived from information obtained via Project SUMS.

Formative Behavioral Research among HIV+ MSM

Name: Project SUMS (Seropositive Urban Men’s Study)
Funder: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Dates: 9/30/1996-09/29/1998
Principal Investigator and Co-PI: Jeffrey Parsons, PhD, Perry N. Halkitis, PhD, MS

Study Description

A survey of the sexual behaviors of HIV-positive MSM in two urban HIV epicenters (New York City and San Francisco) conducted to provide information for the development of a behavioral intervention for HIV-positive gay and bisexual men that would reduce the risk for HIV transmission and promote serostatus disclosure. The objectives of the project were (a) to compare the feasibility of recruiting self-identified HIV-positive MSM from three community settings; (b) to describe serostatus disclosure and sex practices of HIV-positive MSM; (c) to identify factors that help or hinder serostatus disclosure and the maintenance of safer sex practices; and (d) to elicit ideas regarding risk-reduction interventions for HIV-positive MSM.